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                    [post_content] => Throughout my life's journey I have read several books on Yogic Philosophy that talk about uncovering the True Self. Truthfully, this has always seemed a somewhat nebulous concept to me. I have been a student of Yogic Philosophy and a practicing Yogi for seven years now and was beginning to get bewildered by what I considered to be unconscious barriers blocking me from connecting with my ‘True Self.’

No matter how hard I tried to get in touch with my ‘True Self’ through meditation, the more elusive it would seem. I would often find myself feeling frustrated, thinking that I was failing in my practice. Through a recent flash of insight, I came to see that ‘True Self’ is closely related to what psychologists refer to as ‘authenticity,’ which is defined as 'the degree to which one is true to one's own personality, spirit or character despite external pressures'. Personally, I feel that it means living with respect for our intuition, rather than for our intellect alone. It means listening to the 'inner voice' which speaks the truth.

Staying connected to my True Self, no matter how that is conceived, has always been a challenge for me, as I have always prized intellectual pursuits and prided myself on being a well-read student of various disciplines. But I've come to realize that spending too much time in the intellectual domain can create imbalance and become a breeding ground for the ego's controlling tendencies.

Imbalance and ego-dominance can manifest in a variety of ways often leading to suffering, as we move further away from the vulnerable state required to connect with our true selves and our authentic voices. This intuitive insight came to me after a meditation session and I had uncovered my answer.

The root cause of the struggle, which was blocking me from moving deeper into my practice, was related to control. Understanding this, I began using meditation and extended Savasanas as a means of addressing the issue. Consequently, Savasana holds a much deeper meaning for me now. Instead of simply being a relaxation pose, it has come to represent 'conscious surrender', which previously was not even a phrase that I had in my vocabulary.

The quote by Bronnie Ware from her book, The Top Five Regrets of the Dying became somewhat of a mantra to me. It goes like this: "Surrender is not giving up and it takes an enormous amount of courage. Often we are only capable of doing so when the pain of trying to control the outcome becomes too much to bear".  Our egos want so much to be in control of situations, people and especially outcomes. But this hyper-focus on control blocks us from staying present, vulnerable and connected to ourselves, which is essential for creating the life we all want - a balanced life with purpose, healthy relationships and joyful self-expression.

A wise person in my life once told me that 'You can direct your life, but you can't completely control it." I have just recently come to appreciate the meaning of those words.

So how do we let go of this strong desire to control and micromanage our lives? How do we remain vulnerable and connected to our True Selves? Perhaps the first step is to cultivate the awareness that there is a ‘True Self’ behind the veil of control or other impediment. Once we realize this, we can begin to work with loving compassion and gently tame that tiger, creating space and safety for a more authentic life aligned with our True Self.

Namaste.
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                    [post_content] => It seems that when one is presented with an opportunity, it is often met with resistance. A dozen reasons may immediately volunteer themselves as to why one couldn’t or shouldn’t undertake the task.

Okay, let me rephrase and ‘own’ that observation. Why is it that when I am presented with an opportunity, I often balk at it before I even try? The specific situation I am referring to is having been presented with the opportunity to write an article for The Yogic Way Magazine. I had felt that there must be some mistake, even though the heading of the email was “this email is specifically meant for you, so please read”.

Then when I accepted that it wasn’t a mistake, that the email really was sent to me and on purpose, came “OMG, no, there is no way, no possible way I can do that.” It was as if the email speed dialled my ego, which was set on protecting myself from being ‘found out’ regarding the following:

And, furthermore, risking that:

 

I am sure I could go on, but you get the point.

So I did what self-doubt often does, I invited procrastination to join the party. So that is what I did for the past two months. I procrastinated. Seen in a more positive light, I was simply taking the time needed to process the invitation and to allow what felt right to emerge.

If I have learned anything both during my years of yoga practice and in teacher training, it is stop and breathe.  So that is what I did, simply stopped and breathed until I was ready to begin. (Maybe others can relate to the practice of just avoiding things and putting them off ‘until there is no tomorrow!’)

While I have had a steady physical practice of yoga for quite a while now, when it comes to a steady consistent spiritual practice, I fall a bit short.  It’s not that I don’t want to establish a more regular spiritual practice, it’s just that it is a daunting task. I fear that by doing so I will undoubtedly come face to face with my ego which will cause me to have to deal with all those above questions and more.

Nonetheless, dismissing ego with all the appropriate expletives, I have sat down today to trust myself, and have found courage in this opportunity. I have ripped off the band aid, put pen to paper and fingers to keyboard (because I really don’t know what I am doing and need to try both ways).

Hitting the send button as I submit the article, I find the water I have jumped into is deep.
Perhaps this experience will allow me to move forward, and I will uncover some truths about myself and be able to develop a more consistent spiritual practice….. or maybe it will just ‘suck.’ It’s worth giving it a try.  Whatever the outcome, I will stop and breathe.
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            [post_content] => Throughout my life's journey I have read several books on Yogic Philosophy that talk about uncovering the True Self. Truthfully, this has always seemed a somewhat nebulous concept to me. I have been a student of Yogic Philosophy and a practicing Yogi for seven years now and was beginning to get bewildered by what I considered to be unconscious barriers blocking me from connecting with my ‘True Self.’

No matter how hard I tried to get in touch with my ‘True Self’ through meditation, the more elusive it would seem. I would often find myself feeling frustrated, thinking that I was failing in my practice. Through a recent flash of insight, I came to see that ‘True Self’ is closely related to what psychologists refer to as ‘authenticity,’ which is defined as 'the degree to which one is true to one's own personality, spirit or character despite external pressures'. Personally, I feel that it means living with respect for our intuition, rather than for our intellect alone. It means listening to the 'inner voice' which speaks the truth.

Staying connected to my True Self, no matter how that is conceived, has always been a challenge for me, as I have always prized intellectual pursuits and prided myself on being a well-read student of various disciplines. But I've come to realize that spending too much time in the intellectual domain can create imbalance and become a breeding ground for the ego's controlling tendencies.

Imbalance and ego-dominance can manifest in a variety of ways often leading to suffering, as we move further away from the vulnerable state required to connect with our true selves and our authentic voices. This intuitive insight came to me after a meditation session and I had uncovered my answer.

The root cause of the struggle, which was blocking me from moving deeper into my practice, was related to control. Understanding this, I began using meditation and extended Savasanas as a means of addressing the issue. Consequently, Savasana holds a much deeper meaning for me now. Instead of simply being a relaxation pose, it has come to represent 'conscious surrender', which previously was not even a phrase that I had in my vocabulary.

The quote by Bronnie Ware from her book, The Top Five Regrets of the Dying became somewhat of a mantra to me. It goes like this: "Surrender is not giving up and it takes an enormous amount of courage. Often we are only capable of doing so when the pain of trying to control the outcome becomes too much to bear".  Our egos want so much to be in control of situations, people and especially outcomes. But this hyper-focus on control blocks us from staying present, vulnerable and connected to ourselves, which is essential for creating the life we all want - a balanced life with purpose, healthy relationships and joyful self-expression.

A wise person in my life once told me that 'You can direct your life, but you can't completely control it." I have just recently come to appreciate the meaning of those words.

So how do we let go of this strong desire to control and micromanage our lives? How do we remain vulnerable and connected to our True Selves? Perhaps the first step is to cultivate the awareness that there is a ‘True Self’ behind the veil of control or other impediment. Once we realize this, we can begin to work with loving compassion and gently tame that tiger, creating space and safety for a more authentic life aligned with our True Self.

Namaste.
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DIGITAL PRACTICE - The Yogic Way® Magazine (Tag: Truth)

The Yogic Way

Living Authentically: Taming the Tiger of Control

By Janine Daniluck Posted May 16, 2017

Throughout my life's journey I have read several books on Yogic Philosophy that talk about uncovering the True Self. Truthfully, this has always seemed a somewhat nebulous concept to me. I have been a student of Yogic Philosophy and a practicing Yogi for seven years now and was beginning to get bewildered by what I considered to be unconscious barriers blocking me from connecting with my ‘True Self.’ No matter how hard I tried to get in touch with my ‘True Self’ through meditation, the more elusive it would seem. I would often find myself feeling frustrated, thinking that I was failing in my practice. Through a recent flash of insight, I came to see that ‘True Self’ is closely related to what psychologists refer to as ‘authenticity,’ which is defined as 'the degree to which one is true to one's own personality, spirit or character despite external pressures'. Personally, I feel that it means living with respect for our intuition, rather than for our intellect alone. It means listening to …

Trusting Oneself and Finding Courage in Opportunity

By Cindy Reheis Posted November 21, 2016

It seems that when one is presented with an opportunity, it is often met with resistance. A dozen reasons may immediately volunteer themselves as to why one couldn’t or shouldn’t undertake the task. Okay, let me rephrase and ‘own’ that observation. Why is it that when I am presented with an opportunity, I often balk at it before I even try? The specific situation I am referring to is having been presented with the opportunity to write an article for The Yogic Way Magazine. I had felt that there must be some mistake, even though the heading of the email was “this email is specifically meant for you, so please read”. Then when I accepted that it wasn’t a mistake, that the email really was sent to me and on purpose, came “OMG, no, there is no way, no possible way I can do that.” It was as if the email speed dialled my ego, which was set on protecting myself from being ‘found out’ regarding the following: I am not a writer. I don’t know how to write an article. It will …